Archaeologists find early Stone Age houses in Prague

Same Prague district that yielded Stone Age ‘gender bender’ again sheds light on how humans lived millennia ago

Society
Brian Kenety | 07.05.2012

The Czech Archaeological Society (ČSP) has announced the discovery of the remains of houses dating back more than 7,500 years in the Prague district of Bubeneč, along with a burial site there that is about half as old.

“We have managed to unearth impressions of wooden supporting structures of so-called long houses, typical of the Neolithic period,” said ČSP director and researcher Radek Balý, as cited by the Czech state news agency ČTK. Long houses are typical of the Linear Pottery culture in much of Europe at the time.

Over the years, Bubeneč has proved fertile hunting grounds for finds from the early Stone Age up through the Bronze Age. Balý said the area had been continuously populated for many thousands of years.

Last April, Czech archaeologists working in Bubeneč discovered what the international tabloid media came to call the grave of a “gay cavemen” — in fact a unique late Stone Age grave perhaps of a transsexual or “third gender” man dating from between 2500-2800 BC and the era of the so-called Corded Ware culture in the Czech Republic. 

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